socksnake

For a while now the metrics most infrastructures, including Nutanix, are benchmarked against is IOps – effectively the speed the storage layer can take a write or read request from an application or VM and reply back.  Dating back to the (re)birth of SANs when they began running virtual machines and T1 applications this has been the standard for filling out the shit vs excellent spreadsheet that dictates where to spend all your money.

Recently thanks to some education and a bit of online pressure from peers in the industry, synthetic testing with tools like IOmeter have generally been displaced in favour of real-world testing platforms and methodology.  Even smarter tools such as Jetstress doesn’t give real world results because it focuses on storage and not the entire solution.  Recording and replaying operations to generate genuine load and behaviour is far better. Seeing the impact from the application and platform mean our plucky hero admin can produce a recommendation based on fact rather than fantasy.

Synthetic testing is basically like stuffing a pair of socks down your pants; it gets a lot of attention from superficial types but its only a precursor to disappointment later down the line when things get serious.

In this entry I want to drop into your conscious mind the idea that very soon performance stats will be irrelevant to everyone in the infrastructure business.  Everyone.  You, me, them, him, her, all of us will look like foolish dinosaurs if we sell our solutions based on thousands of IOps, bandwidth capacity or low latency figures.

“My God tell me more,” I hear (one of) you (mumble with a shrug).  Well consider what’s happened in hardware in the last 5ish years just in storage.  We’ve gone from caring about how fast disks spin, to what the caching tier runs on, to tiering hot data in SSD and now the wonders of all-flash.  All in 5 or so years.  Spot a trend?  Bit of Moore’s Law happening?  You bet, and it’s only going to get quicker, bigger and cheaper.  Up next new storage mediums like NVMe and Intel’s 3D XPoint will move the raw performance game on even further, well beyond what 99% of VMs will need.  Nutanix’s resident performance secret agent Michael Webster (NPX007) wrote a wonderful blog about the upcoming performance impacts this new hardware will have on networking so I’d encourage you to read it.  The grammar is infinitely better for starters.

So when we get to a point, sooner than you think, when a single node could rip through >100,000 IOps with existing generations of Intel CPUs and RAM where does that leave us when evaluating platforms?  Not synthetic statistics that’s for sure.

Oooow IO!

Oooow IO!

By taking away the uncertainty of application performance almost overnight we can start reframe the entire conversation to a handful of areas:

Simplicity

Scalability

Predictability

Insightfulness

Openness

Delight

Over the next few weeks (maybe longer as I’m on annual leave soon) I’m going to try to tackle each one of these in turn because for me the way systems are evaluated is changing and it will only benefit the consumer and the end customer when the industry players take note.

Without outlandish numbers those vendors who prefer their Speedos with extra padding will quickly be exposed.

See you for part 1 in a while.